What Do The Columns On The Peers Table Mean?

The Peers table provides detailed information about messages sent by your peers.

Important: If you do not have a Multi-Brand account, your account does not use peers.

Each of the columns on the Peers Table is described below.

Note: The numbers shown for the open rate, click through rate, click rate, conversion rate, and contact loss rate are in reference to the last delivery made from the peer account.
Column Name Description Additional Information
Last Delivery The Last Delivery column indicates the date of the last delivery sent from the sub-account. N/A
Total Last Period The Total Last Period column indicates the number of emails sent from the sub-account during the last billing period.

The Total Last Period column numbers are dependent on the period start date for each sub-account. This needs to be taken into consideration if you add up the numbers in this column, and attempt to compare it to the to the total email volume for your account. Because the allocation period for each individual sub-account may differ from the allocation period for your account, these numbers may not align.

Total This Period The Total This Period column indicates the number of emails sent from the sub-account during the current billing period. N/A
Open Rate

The open rate represents the percentage of emails that were opened, as compared to the number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Render Rate The calculation does not take into account the send history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a date prior to the start of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a message was sent 100 times a previous day and 100 times on a date within the report range. The message is opened 125 times within the report range. In this case, the Open Rate on the report is 125% because the message was opened more times than it was sent.

The open rate is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. The open rate lets you see out of all the contacts who received the email you sent, who actually took the time to open it. You can use the open rate to gauge the effectiveness of your from name, from address, and subject line.

Click Through Rate

The click through rate represents the number of clicks that were recorded, as compared to the number of emails delivered.

The click through rate gives you an overall indication of contacts who, first received your message, and second, were engaged enough to open it and click on a link.
Tip: The click through rate metric is a legacy calculation. For a more useful calculation, we suggest you view the click rate. The click rate is determined by the number of unique clicks over the number of opens. For more information on the click rate, see Click Rate Metric.
Click Rate

The click rate represents the number of unique clicks that were recorded, as compared to the number of unique opens recorded. DMA/EEC equivalent: Click to Open Rate (CTO) The calculation does not take into account the history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a day prior to the start of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a contact may have opened a message on a previous day, but clicked on the message on a day within the report range.

The click rate is important because it represents the second level of contact engagement. The click rate gives you an indication of how effective the email you sent was at getting contacts to click the links contained therein. The click rate can also give you an idea of how effective the placement and design of your calls to action are.

Conversion Rate

The conversion rate represents the percentage of conversions made, as compared to the number of clicks recorded. The calculation does not take into account the history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a day prior to the starting date of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a contact may have clicked on a message on a previous day, but converted on a day within the report range.

The conversion rate metric is important because it indicates how effective the email you sent was at getting your contacts to perform an action. Whether it's making a purchase or downloading a white paper, the goal of email marketing is to compel your contacts to perform an action.

Contact Loss (email)

The contact loss metric represents the total number of contacts that were marked as inactive and can no longer receive marketing emails from you as a result of this email. For more information on the inactive status type, see Contact Status

The contact loss metric is important because it points out potential problems in the targeting of your deliveries, and/or the design and content of your message. If you notice a high number under contact loss, you should review both who you are sending to, and what you are sending them. There is a good chance you are either sending to a bad list or segment, or sending the wrong emails to the wrong group of contacts.

Email Sender Rating Your sender rating is driven by the level of contact engagement (opens, clicks, conversions) your sent emails that were received, complaints your emails receive from ISP Feedback Loop, and internal measurements that we use to help you optimize your deliverability.
Tip: For more information on the email sender rating, see Sender and Delivery Rating.