Report Deliverability Metrics

The Deliverability tab on a report displays all of the metrics related to the delivery of messages.

This is a good place to look for information when you want to better understand how your deliveries are doing. Here you can see if sends are being successfully delivered, what issues might have occurred with deliveries for a message, and if contacts are engaging.

The Deliverability tab is divided into five areas, each with a distinct label. We've broken up this help topic into sections based on those areas to make information easier to find.

Summary

This section offers a quick glance at the metrics that are related to counts, that is, how many times did something happen. Counts includes things like how many times your message was sent and how many times different events prevented the message from being successfully delivered. All of the counts in this section can also be viewed in the Performance Over Time section.

Deliverability Tab Overview

Rates

This section displays what percentage of your sent messages were delivered and what percentage of your delivered messages resulted in contact losses. You can see more information about what metrics affected these percentages in the Comparison section.

Comparisons

This section provides a visual comparison of rates against each other. It's a way to quickly see if there are any issues that need to be addressed. Each metric is represented by a different color on the circle and you can mouse over the segments of the circle to focus on a segment.

Comparison Report

This table explains the comparison of these metrics and how it's important. For information about the individual metrics that are being compared, see the Deliverability Tab Metrics table.

Comparison Description
Undeliverable Sends A send can be undeliverable due to hard, soft, or spam bounces. Each type of bounce should be addressed in a different way, so knowing what the cause of your undeliverable sends allows you to know where to start troubleshooting.
  • Hard Bounce: typically from a mailbox and/or domain does not exist for an email address. If you see a lot of hard bounces, evaluate the lists you send to.
  • Soft Bounce: temporary delivery failures that can be caused by a variety of resolvable issues.
  • Spam Bounce: email server has identified the email as spam. If you see a number of these, look at the message you sent and run it through a spam test.
Soft Bounces Typically a soft bounce is due to either a contact or network issue. If you see a large quantity of soft bounces and they are from a network issue, you might want to check if there were any network outages and try sending the message again.
  • Temporary Contact Issue: temporary issue at the receiving mail server with respect to the contact in question. An example of this is a mailbox full message.
  • Destination Unreachable: temporary issue at the receiving mail server, such as a server busy message.
  • Unclassified: the number of bounces that could not be classified using our bounce classification system.
Contact Loss This breaks down the sources of contact loss to complaints, unsubscribes, and/or bounces. Knowing where contact loss is coming from, particularly if this metric is high, can help you know how to stop it.
  • Unsubscribes: represents the percentage of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by unsubscribing.
  • Application Complaints: the number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via the application through a webform.
  • ISP Complaints: The ISP complaints metric the number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via an ISP feedback loop.
  • Inactive Due To Bounce: the total number of contacts that were made inactive because they exceeded the bounce limit you have set in your account.
Skipped Deliveries Skipped deliveries are either from exceeding your sending frequency cap or exceeding your onboarding sending limit. Knowing which of these caused skipped deliveries lets you know which sending behavior to adjust.
  • Frequency Cap: the number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the email frequency cap settings you have in your account.
  • Onboarding: the total number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the number of contacts with a status of onboarding you can send to at this time.

Performance Over Time

This section provides a configurable graph that can be used to:
  • View counts, rates, and revenue metrics at different points in time.
  • See time-based trends for individual metrics.
  • Visually compare different metrics, and their trends, against each other

The time range shown is the length of time set for the report. You can change this by clicking the calendar Report Calendar Filter icon and settings a different report range. When you do this, all of the other metrics on the report will also be updated.

You can view any count, rate, or revenue metrics on this graph. Count and revenue metrics are represented using a line graph and rate metrics are represented with bar graphs. Each metric is color coded and the guide for metrics currently represented on the graph are provided in the legend below the graph. Click the filter Performance Over Time Filter icon and click on a metric to either add or remove it from the graph.

The count, rate, and revenue metrics are divided into three separate tables to make it easier to find the metric explanation you're looking for,

Deliverability By Domain (All Time)

This section id="section-5" displays the performance metrics on a per-domain-basis. The domain column in this table is the sending domain. The main purpose of this table is to allow you to quickly see if any of your domains have issues sending and what might be causing these issues. All of the metrics in this table are defined in the table above.

All Deliverability Tab Metrics

All of the metrics from every section of this tab are listed below in alphabetical order.

Metric Description Why It's Useful
Average Order Value This metric represents the average revenue generated per order tracked in your account. It's important because it gives you an idea of how much contacts are spending, on average, each time an order is made.
Complaints This is the number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via an ISP feedback loop, or via the application. This helps clarify why you're losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via their ISP, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain via their ISP or via the application. They can do this by clicking the Report Spam button (or similarly named button) after receiving an email from you.
Contact Loss Rate The contact loss rate represents the percentage of contacts that were marked as inactive and can no longer receive marketing messages from you as a result of the email you sent them. The contact loss rate is important because it points out potential problems in the targeting of your deliveries, and/or the design and content of your message. If you notice a high number under the contact loss rate, you should review both who you are sending to, and what you are sending them. There is a good chance you are either sending to a bad list or segment, or you're sending the wrong message to the wrong group of contacts.
Conversions

The conversions metric represents the unique conversions recorded. Conversions track contacts who placed an order after interacting with a message delivery (email or SMS). Bronto records unique conversions the first time a contact makes a purchase connected with a message delivery. For example, if a contact buys something from you through a message link, and later makes a second purchase, only one unique conversion is recorded.

The purpose of sending email marketing messages is to compel your contacts to perform an action. Opens may tell you if the subject line is well written, and clicks may tell you how engaging the content is. However, conversions tell you if your contacts are actually performing the action that is the goal of your email marketing campaign.

Delivered

The emails delivered metric represents the total number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Accepted

The Emails delivered metric is important because it let's you know how many total emails were successfully delivered. Once you know how many emails were successfully delivered, you can begin further evaluating the levels of contact engagement (opens, clicks, conversions). You can also figure out how many unsuccessful emails were sent.

Delivery Rate

The delivery rate represents the percentage of emails that were successfully delivered, as compared to the total emails that were sent. DMA/EEC equivalent: Accepted Rate

The delivery rate metric is important because it represents the first step in determining the success of your email marketing efforts. In order for contacts to open, click, and eventually convert, they first have to receive an email from you.

Hard Bounce (email)
Hard bounces are permanent delivery failures. For example, the mailbox and/or domain does not exist for an email address. The from hard bounce metric represents the number of sent emails that were not delivered due to hard bounces.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The from hard bounce metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of hard bounces, you need to review who you are sending to and the content you are sending.

Revenue

The Email Revenue metric represents the total revenue tracked for emails sent from the application. This revenue is tied to specific emails sent from the application.

The Email Revenue metric is important because it allows you see the revenue that directly ties to your email marketing efforts.

Revenue Per Email

The Revenue Per Email metric represents the average revenue tracked for an email successfully delivered from your account.

The Revenue Per Email metric is important because it allows you to see how much revenue, on average, a successfully delivered email earns.

Sends
The emails sent metric represents the total number of emails that were sent.
Note: Deleted email deliveries will still be counted as part of the emails sent metric.

The emails sent metric is important to know for two main reasons. First, you need to know the number of emails sent for the purpose of making sure you don't exceed the number of emails allocated for your account. Second, the emails sent metric is the starting point for evaluating how many of your emails actually got delivered.

Skipped (Frequency Cap) The frequency cap (skipped) metric represents the number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the email frequency cap settings you have in your account. There are several reasons why you might see a high number of emails skipped for exceeding your frequency cap settings. You could simply be scheduling too many deliveries to your contacts, or you might have an automated message rule that is sending too much. Skipped deliveries represent missed conversion opportunities, so you'll want to review your sending process to try and prevent skipped deliveries from occurring.
Skipped (Onboarding) The onboarding (skipped) metric represents the total number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the number of contacts with a status of onboarding you can send to at this time. The onboarding (skipped) metric is important for two reasons. First, it let's you know about any contacts that could not be sent to. Second, it gives you an indication of how the contacts you are importing are affecting your account. If you are continually seeing a high number of contacts skipped due to onboarding, it could mean you are trying to import a bad list. If you are importing a healthy list, contacts should very quickly move from onboarding to active.
Soft Bounce (email)
Soft bounces are temporary delivery failures. A soft bounce may occur if a contact's inbox is full, or the receiving email server is down.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The soft bounce metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of soft bounces, you should review who you are sending to and the content you are sending.

Spam Bounce This is the number of times a message was rejected due to the email server identifying the email as spam. If you see a number of these, look at the message content and run your message through a spam test.
Total Clicks

The total clicks metric, similar to clicks, is important because it represents a level of contact engagement beyond just opens and begins to highlight the effectiveness of your message content. Where as with clicks your are able to determine that contacts were interested in the content of your message, total clicks allows you to get some idea of the frequency of that interest.

The total clicks metric is a total of all times links were clicked in a particular message, delivery, A/B split test, automated message rule, or delivery groups

Undeliverable (email)

The email undeliverable metric represents the number of sent emails that were not delivered.

The email undeliverable metric is important because it tells you how many of your sent emails were not delivered.

Unsubscribes The unsubscribes metric represents the total number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by unsubscribing. A contact can unsubscribe via an unsubscribe webform or a manage preferences webform. It's important because it helps clarify why you're losing contacts. If a contact unsubscribes themselves (via a manage preferences form or other method), this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to manually unsubscribe themselves to be counted in this metric.