Downloaded Report Content

After you download your exported report, it will contain certain core metrics.

Each report is a summary report, with the metrics as column headers. Depending on the type of report you exported, deliveries, messages, segments, etc. are separated by row.
Note: When your report includes device-level metrics, the report contains additional metrics broken out by Desktop, Phone, Table, and Other device types. Device-level metrics are: Total Opens, Unique Opens, Open Rate, Total Clicks, Unique Clicks, Click Rate, Conversions, Conversion Rate, Orders, Total Revenue, RPE, and AOV.
Metric Description Why It's Useful
Campaign/Default Campaign

For Delivery Report, Email Performance Report, and Delivery Summary exports, the Campaign column displays the campaign the delivery was a part of when it was sent.

For Message Report and Email Summary Report exports (at the Message Summary level), the Default Campaign column shows the default campaign for the message.

The Campaign column is important because it lets you to tie individual delivery and message performance back to their parent campaign. You can also manually sort on this column in the spreadsheet to get a campaign-level breakdown of all deliveries or messages when you view a Delivery or Message Summary from the Email Performance Report export.
Delivery Type
The delivery Type represents the type of send. Each type is described below:
  • Normal: The Normal email delivery type represents a regular email delivery sent to more than one contact.
  • Bulk: The Bulk email delivery type represents email messages that were sent in bulk and includes normal deliveries and split deliveries.
  • Skipped: The Skipped email delivery type represents email messages that were skipped by Bronto and not sent.
  • Single Contact: The Single Contact email delivery type represents emails deliveries that were sent to only a single contact. Email deliveries sent via workflows are always marked as Single Contact, but this delivery type also includes email deliveries manually sent to a single contact or sent to a single contact via the API.
  • Test: The Test email delivery type represents email deliveries that were sent as test deliveries.
  • AMR: The AMR email delivery type represents email deliveries that were sent via an Automated Message Rule.
  • Split Group: The Split Group email delivery type represents email deliveries that were sent as part of an A/B split test. If you hover over the Split Group text, a tool-tip will appear that contains the name of the split group.
  • FTAF: The Forwards to a Friend email delivery type represents email deliveries that were sent as part of a FTAF webform. FTAF deliveries do not appear in delivery groups.
  • Transactional: The Transactional email delivery type represents email deliveries were sent as transactional emails.
N/A
Sends
The emails sent metric represents the total number of emails that were sent.
Note: Deleted email deliveries will still be counted as part of the emails sent metric.

The emails sent metric is important to know for two main reasons. First, you need to know the number of emails sent for the purpose of making sure you don't exceed the number of emails allocated for your account. Second, the emails sent metric is the starting point for evaluating how many of your emails actually got delivered.

Delivered

The emails delivered metric represents the total number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Accepted

The Emails delivered metric is important because it let's you know how many total emails were successfully delivered. Once you know how many emails were successfully delivered, you can begin further evaluating the levels of contact engagement (opens, clicks, conversions). You can also figure out how many unsuccessful emails were sent.

Delivery Rate

The delivery rate represents the percentage of emails that were successfully delivered, as compared to the total emails that were sent. DMA/EEC equivalent: Accepted Rate

The delivery rate metric is important because it represents the first step in determining the success of your email marketing efforts. In order for contacts to open, click, and eventually convert, they first have to receive an email from you.

Unique Opens The unique opens metric is the sum of all the unique opens recorded for a message. A unique open is recorded the first time a contact opens a message. This is important because it helps you better understand the relationship between opens and clicks/conversions. The click rate compares that total opens metric with the total clicks metric. You can compare the number of unique opens to the number of click to see the rate at which the number of contacts who open a message click a link.
Total Opens

The opens metric represents the unique opens. A unique open is recorded the first time a contact opens an email. If a contact opens an email 5 times, only 1 unique open is recorded. DMA/EEC equivalent: Unique Renders

The opens metric is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. Although you can't actually tell what your contacts are doing with the email you sent them, you can at least tell that they were interested enough to open it. A high number of opens is usually indicative of a strong subject line and a trusted from name, since these are the only things a contact can see in their inbox before actually opening the email you sent them.

Average Opens The average opens metric represents the average number of times sent emails were opened. For example, if there are 20 total opens and 5 opens are recorded, then the average opens would be 4. The average opens metric is important because it represents an initial level of average interaction with emails you send. It can also signify that the subject line is effective and the from name is trusted.

To determine how effective the average opens number really is, compare the average opens metric to clicks. If your average opens number is really high and you aren't seeing many clicks, then you might want to reconsider message design.

Open Rate

The open rate represents the percentage of emails that were opened, as compared to the number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Render Rate The calculation does not take into account the send history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a date prior to the start of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a message was sent 100 times a previous day and 100 times on a date within the report range. The message is opened 125 times within the report range. In this case, the Open Rate on the report is 125% because the message was opened more times than it was sent.

The open rate is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. The open rate lets you see out of all the contacts who received the email you sent, who actually took the time to open it. You can use the open rate to gauge the effectiveness of your from name, from address, and subject line.

Unique Clicks The unique clicks metric is the sum of all the unique clicks recorded for a message. A unique click is recorded the first time a contact clicks any link contained in a message. If a contact clicks a link 9 times, 1 unique click is recorded. If 2 contacts each click a link 10 times, then 2 clicks are recorded. If a single contact clicks 5 different links, than 1 unique click is recorded. This is important because it helps you better understand the relationship between clicks and conversions. The conversion rate compares the total number of clicks to the total number of conversions. You can compare the number of unique clicks to the number of conversions to see the rate at which the number of contacts who click a link convert.
Total Clicks

The total clicks metric, similar to clicks, is important because it represents a level of contact engagement beyond just opens and begins to highlight the effectiveness of your message content. Where as with clicks your are able to determine that contacts were interested in the content of your message, total clicks allows you to get some idea of the frequency of that interest.

The total clicks metric is a total of all times links were clicked in a particular message, delivery, A/B split test, automated message rule, or delivery groups

Average Clicks The average clicks metric represents the average number of times a link was clicked in an email. For example, if your email has 20 total clicks and 5 clicks, then the average clicks would be 4. It is important because it can represent a high or low level of average interaction with your email. It can also signify whether message content is effective at engaging your contacts.
Click Rate

The click rate represents the number of unique clicks that were recorded, as compared to the number of unique opens recorded. DMA/EEC equivalent: Click to Open Rate (CTO) The calculation does not take into account the history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a day prior to the start of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a contact may have opened a message on a previous day, but clicked on the message on a day within the report range.

The click rate is important because it represents the second level of contact engagement. The click rate gives you an indication of how effective the email you sent was at getting contacts to click the links contained therein. The click rate can also give you an idea of how effective the placement and design of your calls to action are.

Conversions

The conversions metric represents the unique conversions recorded. Conversions track contacts who placed an order after interacting with a message delivery (email or SMS). Bronto records unique conversions the first time a contact makes a purchase connected with a message delivery. For example, if a contact buys something from you through a message link, and later makes a second purchase, only one unique conversion is recorded.

The purpose of sending email marketing messages is to compel your contacts to perform an action. Opens may tell you if the subject line is well written, and clicks may tell you how engaging the content is. However, conversions tell you if your contacts are actually performing the action that is the goal of your email marketing campaign.

Conversion Rate

The conversion rate represents the percentage of conversions made, as compared to the number of clicks recorded. The calculation does not take into account the history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a day prior to the starting date of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a contact may have clicked on a message on a previous day, but converted on a day within the report range.

The conversion rate metric is important because it indicates how effective the email you sent was at getting your contacts to perform an action. Whether it's making a purchase or downloading a white paper, the goal of email marketing is to compel your contacts to perform an action.

Orders The number of unique orders that are associated with the message. This is important because it lets you compare the number of orders to the revenue and revenue per email metrics to determine if revenue is coming from a high volume of orders or from a small volume of high-revenue orders.
Revenue/ Total Revenue

The Email Revenue metric represents the total revenue tracked for emails sent from the application. This revenue is tied to specific emails sent from the application.

The Email Revenue metric is important because it allows you see the revenue that directly ties to your email marketing efforts.

Revenue Per Email

The Revenue Per Email metric represents the average revenue tracked for an email successfully delivered from your account.

The Revenue Per Email metric is important because it allows you to see how much revenue, on average, a successfully delivered email earns.

Average Order Value (AOV) The average order value is a comparison of the number of orders to the total revenue. This is important because it provides insight into how much contacts are spending, on average, each time an order is placed.
Contact Updates
The contact updates metric represents the number of times a contact updated their information using a manage preferences link contained in an email you sent them.
Tip: For more information on adding a manage preferences link to your message, see Insert A Link To A Webform Using The WYSIWYG Editor. For more information on manage preferences webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The contact updates metric is important because it allows you to see how many contacts updated their information via a manage preferences link contained in an email you sent them. If you notice that the contact updates number is high, you should dig a little deeper and find out what contacts are doing once they get to the manage preferences page. Depending on the actions they are taking on the manage preferences page, you may need to re-work the content of the email, or re-evaluate the list or segment you are sending to.

Contact Update Rate This metric represents the percentage of contacts who updated information using a manage preferences link contained in the email compared to the number of contacts who were sent the email. This is important because a high rate can reveal an issue with the accuracy of your contact data. If you notice that the contact updates number is high, dig a little deeper and find out what updates contacts make using the manage preferences page. Depending on these actions, you may need to rework the content of the email, or reevaluate the lists or segments you've sent to.
Contact Loss Rate
The contact loss rate represents the percentage of contacts that were marked as inactive and can no longer receive marketing messages from you as a result of the email you sent them.
Tip: For more information on the inactive status type, see Contact Status

The contact loss rate is important because it points out potential problems in the targeting of your deliveries, and/or the design and content of your message. If you notice a high number under the contact loss rate, you should review both who you are sending to, and what you are sending them. There is a good chance you are either sending to a bad list or segment, or you're sending the wrong message to the wrong group of contacts.

Unsubscribes The unsubscribes metric represents the total number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by unsubscribing. A contact can unsubscribe via an unsubscribe webform or a manage preferences webform. It's important because it helps clarify why you're losing contacts. If a contact unsubscribes themselves (via a manage preferences form or other method), this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to manually unsubscribe themselves to be counted in this metric.
Unsubscribe Rate
The Unsubscribe Rate metric represents the percentage of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by unsubscribing. Specifically these contacts reached an unsubscribed status after one of the following:
  • Complaining through an ISP feedback loop or through the application complaint system
  • Exceeding the bounce limit that you set

The Unsubscribe Rate metric is important because it shows the rate at which contacts are unsubscribing. If a contact unsubscribes themselves (via a manage preferences form or other method), this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to manually unsubscribe themselves to be counted in this metric. You can monitor this metric overtime to see if changes to your sending habits are lowering the Unsubscribe Rate.

Hard Bounce (email)
Hard bounces are permanent delivery failures. For example, the mailbox and/or domain does not exist for an email address. The from hard bounce metric represents the number of sent emails that were not delivered due to hard bounces.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The from hard bounce metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of hard bounces, you need to review who you are sending to and the content you are sending.

Soft Bounce (email)
Soft bounces are temporary delivery failures. A soft bounce may occur if a contact's inbox is full, or the receiving email server is down.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The soft bounce metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of soft bounces, you should review who you are sending to and the content you are sending.

Spam Bounce This is the number of times a message was rejected due to the email server identifying the email as spam. If you see a number of these, look at the message content and run your message through a spam test.
Bounce Rate
The bounce rate indicates the percentage of bounces (as compared to the number delivered) recorded for a particular message, delivery, A/B split test, automated message rule, or delivery group.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.
The bounce rate metric is important because it gives you an idea of how your message is performing from a deliverability perspective. If the bounce rate is high, your sender/delivery rating will be negatively affected and contacts may not be receiving your message. The bounce rate rolls up all the types of bounces into one percentage. To determine what type of bounce occurred, you can view the following metrics which further classify and explain bounces:
Skipped (Frequency Cap) The frequency cap (skipped) metric represents the number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the email frequency cap settings you have in your account. There are several reasons why you might see a high number of emails skipped for exceeding your frequency cap settings. You could simply be scheduling too many deliveries to your contacts, or you might have an automated message rule that is sending too much. Skipped deliveries represent missed conversion opportunities, so you'll want to review your sending process to try and prevent skipped deliveries from occurring.
Skipped (Onboarding) The onboarding (skipped) metric represents the total number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the number of contacts with a status of onboarding you can send to at this time. The onboarding (skipped) metric is important for two reasons. First, it let's you know about any contacts that could not be sent to. Second, it gives you an indication of how the contacts you are importing are affecting your account. If you are continually seeing a high number of contacts skipped due to onboarding, it could mean you are trying to import a bad list. If you are importing a healthy list, contacts should very quickly move from onboarding to active.
Complaints The Complaint (From Complaint) metric represents the total number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via either an ISP feedback loop, or the application's complaint system.

The Complaint (From Complaint) metric is important because it clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via their ISP or via the application, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain via their ISP or via the application.

ISP Feedback Loop
The From Complaint—ISP Feedback metric represents the number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via an ISP feedback loop.
Warning: A high number of complaints will negatively impact your sender and delivery rating. For information on sender and delivery rating, see Sender and Delivery Rating.
Tip: For more information on fixing a low sender or delivery rating, see Tips For Fixing A Low Email Sender/Delivery Rating.

The From Complaint—ISP Feedback metric is important because it clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via their ISP, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain via their ISP. They can do this by clicking the Report Spam button (or similarly named button) after receiving an email from you.

Bronto Feedback Loop
The From Complaint—Bronto Feedback metric represents the number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via the application. A contact can complain using a Complaint webform.
Warning: A high number of complaints will negatively impact your sender and delivery rating. For information on sender and delivery rating, see Sender and Delivery Rating.
Tip: For more information on fixing a low sender or delivery rating, see Tips For Fixing A Low Email Sender/Delivery Rating.
Tip: For more information on Complaint webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The From Complaint—Bronto Feedback metric is important because it clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via the application, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain the Complaint webform. They can do this by clicking the link to a Complaint webform in an email they receive from you.

Complaint Rate The Complaint Rate metric represents the percentage of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via an ISP feedback loop, or via the application.
The Complaint Rate is important because it better clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via their ISP, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain via their ISP or via the application. They can do this by clicking the Report Spam button (or similarly named button) after receiving an email from you.
Warning: A high number of complaints will negatively impact your sender and delivery rating. For information on the sender and delivery ratings, see Sender and Delivery Rating.
Tip: For more information on fixing a low sender or delivery rating, see Tips For Fixing A Low Email Sender/Delivery Rating.
Net Response Rate Net Response Rate is a composite metric that represents open rate times click through rate times conversion rate. This is important because it represents the most comprehensive performance of your email content as it relates to opens, click throughs, and conversions from end-to-end.
Campaign Type The Campaign Type is the type of marketing campaign you plan to associate with this campaign. For example, you could have a Welcome Series or a Birthday campaign. This is important because you can analyze which campaign types are most effective and use that information to inform future marketing efforts.