Summary Report Metrics

A summary report allows you to download summary metrics for a report.

Message reports maintain metrics for all deliveries, even deliveries that have been deleted. Hence, if you add up the metrics on all the available delivery reports for deliveries made from a message, it may not add up to the totals on the message report due to the presence of metrics from deleted deliveries.

Note: The metrics associated with test deliveries are not included in message reports. If you wish to view the metrics associated with a test delivery made from a message, click Show Metrics For: and choose to view a delivery report for a test delivery. Keep this in mind if you create a message and only send test deliveries from the message because all of the metrics on the message report for the message will be zero, however, there will be metrics on the delivery reports for the individual test deliveries.
Metric Description Why It's Useful
Sent
The emails sent metric represents the total number of emails that were sent.
Note: Deleted email deliveries will still be counted as part of the emails sent metric.

The emails sent metric is important to know for two main reasons. First, you need to know the number of emails sent for the purpose of making sure you don't exceed the number of emails allocated for your account. Second, the emails sent metric is the starting point for evaluating how many of your emails actually got delivered.

Delivered

The emails delivered metric represents the total number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Accepted

The Emails delivered metric is important because it let's you know how many total emails were successfully delivered. Once you know how many emails were successfully delivered, you can begin further evaluating the levels of contact engagement (opens, clicks, conversions). You can also figure out how many unsuccessful emails were sent.

Opens

The opens metric represents the unique opens. A unique open is recorded the first time a contact opens an email. If a contact opens an email 5 times, only 1 unique open is recorded. DMA/EEC equivalent: Unique Renders

The opens metric is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. Although you can't actually tell what your contacts are doing with the email you sent them, you can at least tell that they were interested enough to open it. A high number of opens is usually indicative of a strong subject line and a trusted from name, since these are the only things a contact can see in their inbox before actually opening the email you sent them.

Total Opens
The total opens metric represents the total number of opens recorded for a particular message, delivery, A/B split test, automated message rule, or delivery group. If contact Alex Example opens an email you sent them 5 times, and contact Jayne Example opens an email you sent them 10 times, then 15 would be recorded for the total opens metric.
Note: The total opens metric is not the same thing as the opens metrics (which records unique opens). For more information on the opens metric, see Opens Metric.

The total opens metric, similar to opens, is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. Although you can't actually tell what your contacts are doing with the email you sent them, you can at least tell that they were interested enough to open it. A high number of opens is usually indicative of a strong subject line and a trusted from name, since these are the only things a contact can see in their inbox before actually opening the email you sent them.

Average Opens
The average opens metric represents the average number of times emails you sent were opened. For example, if 20 total opens and 5 emails are recorded, then the average opens would be 4.
Note: Total opens and opens are not the same metric. For more information on what each metric means, see Total Opens Metric and Opens Metric.

The average opens metric is important because it represents an initial level of average interaction with emails you send. It can also signify that the subject line is effective and the from name is trusted.

Clicks

The clicks metric is a per contact metric that represents the unique clicks recorded. A unique click is recorded the first time a contact clicks any link contained in an email you send them. If a contact clicks a link 9 times, 1 unique click will be recorded. If 2 contacts each click a link 10 times, then 2 clicks will be recorded. If a single contact clicks 5 different links, than 1 unique click is recorded and 1 would appear under the clicks metric. DMA/EEC equivalent: Click Through

The clicks metric is important because it represents a level of contact engagement beyond just opens, and begins to highlight the effectiveness of the content contained in your emails. With clicks, you can tell how many contacts were interested enough to open and then click the links contained in the email you sent them.

Total Clicks
The total clicks metric is a contact centric metric that represents the total number of times contacts clicked links contained in the email you sent them. If Taylor Doe
  • clicks link A 10 times
  • and clicks link B 5 times
And Taylor Doe
  • clicks link B 5 times
Then 20 total clicks are recorded.

The total clicks metric, similar to clicks, is important because it represents a level of contact engagement beyond just opens and begins to highlight the effectiveness of your message content. Where as with clicks your are able to determine that contacts were interested in the content of your message, total clicks allows you to get some idea of the frequency of that interest.

Average Clicks

The average clicks metric represents the average number of times a link was clicked in an email. For example, if your email has 20 total clicks and 5 links, then the average clicks would be 4.

The average clicks metric is important because it can represent a high level of average interaction with your email. It can also signify that the content is effective at engaging your contacts.

Conversions

The conversions metric represents the unique conversions recorded. Conversions track contacts who placed an order after interacting with a message delivery (email or SMS). Bronto records unique conversions the first time a contact makes a purchase connected with a message delivery. For example, if a contact buys something from you through a message link, and later makes a second purchase, only one unique conversion is recorded.

The purpose of sending email marketing messages is to compel your contacts to perform an action. Opens may tell you if the subject line is well written, and clicks may tell you how engaging the content is. However, conversions tell you if your contacts are actually performing the action that is the goal of your email marketing campaign.

Email Orders

The Email Orders metric represents orders made from emails you sent from the application. These orders are the result of a contact clicking through an email you sent them and then placing an order. These orders have specific emails sent from the application associated with them. When a contact places an order as a result of being sent an email, a conversion is recorded. From a single conversion, multiple orders can be made. It is possible to have more orders than conversions. For example, if a contact clicks from an email to your site, purchases a shirt, and then also decides to purchase a hat, that could represent 2 orders made from 1 conversion.

The Email Orders metrics is important because it allows you to see the number of orders directly tied to your email marketing efforts. Because a contact clicked though an email you sent them from the application, we are able to associate that order with a specific delivery and contact.

Revenue Per Order

The Revenue Per Order metric represents the average revenue generated per order tracked in your account.

The Revenue Per Order metric is important because it gives you an idea of how much contacts are spending, on average, each time an order is made.

Email Revenue

The Email Revenue metric represents the total revenue tracked for emails sent from the application. This revenue is tied to specific emails sent from the application.

The Email Revenue metric is important because it allows you see the revenue that directly ties to your email marketing efforts.

Delivery Rate

The delivery rate represents the percentage of emails that were successfully delivered, as compared to the total emails that were sent. DMA/EEC equivalent: Accepted Rate

The delivery rate metric is important because it represents the first step in determining the success of your email marketing efforts. In order for contacts to open, click, and eventually convert, they first have to receive an email from you.

Open Rate

The open rate represents the percentage of emails that were opened, as compared to the number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Render Rate The calculation does not take into account the send history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a date prior to the start of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a message was sent 100 times a previous day and 100 times on a date within the report range. The message is opened 125 times within the report range. In this case, the Open Rate on the report is 125% because the message was opened more times than it was sent.

The open rate is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. The open rate lets you see out of all the contacts who received the email you sent, who actually took the time to open it. You can use the open rate to gauge the effectiveness of your from name, from address, and subject line.

Click Rate

The click rate represents the number of unique clicks that were recorded, as compared to the number of unique opens recorded. DMA/EEC equivalent: Click to Open Rate (CTO) The calculation does not take into account the history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a day prior to the start of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a contact may have opened a message on a previous day, but clicked on the message on a day within the report range.

The click rate is important because it represents the second level of contact engagement. The click rate gives you an indication of how effective the email you sent was at getting contacts to click the links contained therein. The click rate can also give you an idea of how effective the placement and design of your calls to action are.

Click Through Rate

The click through rate represents the number of clicks that were recorded, as compared to the number of emails delivered.

The click through rate gives you an overall indication of contacts who, first received your message, and second, were engaged enough to open it and click on a link.
Tip: The click through rate metric is a legacy calculation. For a more useful calculation, we suggest you view the click rate. The click rate is determined by the number of unique clicks over the number of opens. For more information on the click rate, see Click Rate Metric.
Conversion Rate

The conversion rate represents the percentage of conversions made, as compared to the number of clicks recorded. The calculation does not take into account the history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a day prior to the starting date of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a contact may have clicked on a message on a previous day, but converted on a day within the report range.

The conversion rate metric is important because it indicates how effective the email you sent was at getting your contacts to perform an action. Whether it's making a purchase or downloading a white paper, the goal of email marketing is to compel your contacts to perform an action.

Bounce Rate
The bounce rate indicates the percentage of bounces (as compared to the number delivered) recorded for a particular message, delivery, A/B split test, automated message rule, or delivery group.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.
The bounce rate metric is important because it gives you an idea of how your message is performing from a deliverability perspective. If the bounce rate is high, your sender/delivery rating will be negatively affected and contacts may not be receiving your message. The bounce rate rolls up all the types of bounces into one percentage. To determine what type of bounce occurred, you can view the following metrics which further classify and explain bounces:
Complaint Rate The Complaint Rate metric represents the percentage of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via an ISP feedback loop, or via the application.
The Complaint Rate is important because it better clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via their ISP, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain via their ISP or via the application. They can do this by clicking the Report Spam button (or similarly named button) after receiving an email from you.
Warning: A high number of complaints will negatively impact your sender and delivery rating. For information on the sender and delivery ratings, see Sender and Delivery Rating.
Tip: For more information on fixing a low sender or delivery rating, see Tips For Fixing A Low Email Sender/Delivery Rating.
Contact Loss Rate (email)
The contact loss rate represents the percentage of contacts that were marked as inactive and can no longer receive marketing messages from you as a result of the email you sent them.
Tip: For more information on the inactive status type, see Contact Status

The contact loss rate is important because it points out potential problems in the targeting of your deliveries, and/or the design and content of your message. If you notice a high number under the contact loss rate, you should review both who you are sending to, and what you are sending them. There is a good chance you are either sending to a bad list or segment, or you're sending the wrong message to the wrong group of contacts.

Total Social Shares (email)
The total social shares metric represents the total number of times social sharing links contained in the email were clicked. For example, if one contact uses the Twitter social sharing link, and another contact uses the Facebook social sharing link, then 2 would be recorded for the total social shares.
Note: Forward to a friend URLs are not included in the total social shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The total social shares metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact takes the time to use the social sharing links, then most likely it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to share it with one of their social networks.

Twitter Shares
The Twitter shares metric represents the total number of times the Twitter social sharing links contained in emails you sent were clicked. For example, if a contact uses the Twitter social sharing link 2 times, then 2 would be recorded for the Twitter shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The Twitter shares metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact takes the time to use the Twitter social sharing link, then most likely it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to share it with their followers on Twitter.

LinkedIn Shares
The LinkedIn shares metric represents the total number of times the LinkedIn social sharing links contained in emails you sent were clicked. For example, if a contact clicks the LinkedIn social sharing link 10 times, then 10 would be recorded for the LinkedIn shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The LinkedIn shares metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact takes the time to click the LinkedIn social sharing link, then most likely it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to share it with their LinkedIn network.

Digg Shares
The Digg shares metric represents the total number of times Digg social sharing links contained in emails you sent were clicked. For example, if a contact clicks the Digg social sharing link 10 times, then 10 would be recorded for the Digg shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The Digg shares metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact takes the time to use the Digg social sharing link, then most likely it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to share it via Digg.

MySpace Shares
The MySpace shares metric represents the total number of times the MySpace social sharing links contained in emails you sent were clicked. For example, if a contact clicks the MySpace social sharing link 10 times, then 10 would be recorded for the MySpace shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The MySpace shares metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact takes the time to click the MySpace social sharing link, then most likely it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to share it with their MySpace network.

Social Views (email)
The social views metric represents the total number of times an email shared via social sharing links was viewed.
Note: Views will be counted for anyone that views the email shared via social sharing links, not just contacts in your account. Forward to a friend URLs are not included in the social shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The social views metric is important because it allows you to see how effective the email you sent is after it has been shared via social sharing links. This metric can give you insight into the effectiveness of using social sharing links in your emails, as well as the effectiveness of your emails with an audience outside your contacts.

Twitter Views
The Twitter views metric represents the total number of times an email shared via a Twitter social sharing link was viewed.
Note: Twitter views will be counted for anyone that views the email shared via the Twitter social sharing link, not just contacts in your account.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The Twitter views metric is important because it allows you to see how effective the email you sent is after it has been shared via Twitter. This metric can give you insight into the effectiveness of using the Twitter social sharing link in your emails, as well as the effectiveness of your emails with an audience outside your contacts.

LinkedIn Views
The LinkedIn views metric represents the total number of times an email shared via a LinkedIn social sharing link was viewed.
Note: LinkedIn views will be counted for anyone that views the email shared via the LinkedIn social sharing link, not just contacts in your account.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The LinkedIn views metric is important because it allows you to see how effective the email you sent is after it has been shared via LinkedIn. This metric can give you insight into the effectiveness of using the LinkedIn social sharing link in your emails, as well as the effectiveness of your emails with an audience outside your contacts.

Digg Views
The Digg views metric represents the total number of times an email shared via a Digg social sharing link was viewed.
Note: Digg views will be counted for anyone that views the email shared via the Digg social sharing link, not just contacts in your account.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The Digg views metric is important because it allows you to see how effective the email you sent is after it has been shared via Digg. This metric can give you insight into the effectiveness of using the Digg social sharing link in your emails, as well as the effectiveness of your emails with an audience outside your contacts.

MySpace Views
The MySpace views metric represents the total number of times an email shared via a MySpace social sharing link was viewed.
Note: MySpace views will be counted for anyone that views the email shared via the MySpace social sharing link, not just contacts in your account.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The MySpace views metric is important because it allows you to see how effective the email you sent is after it has been shared via MySpace. This metric can give you insight into the effectiveness of using the MySpace social sharing link in your emails, as well as the effectiveness of your emails with an audience outside your contacts.

Forwards To A Friend
The forwards to a friend metric represents the total number of times a contact forwarded an email you sent them using the forward to a friend link.
Tip: For more information on adding a forward to a friend link to your message, see Insert A Link To A Webform Using The WYSIWYG Editor. For more information on forward to a friend webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The forwards to a friend metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement, and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact makes the effort to use the forward to a friend link, most of the time it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to forward it to a friend.

Contact Updates (email)
The contact updates metric represents the number of times a contact updated their information using a manage preferences link contained in an email you sent them.
Tip: For more information on adding a manage preferences link to your message, see Insert A Link To A Webform Using The WYSIWYG Editor. For more information on manage preferences webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The contact updates metric is important because it allows you to see how many contacts updated their information via a manage preferences link contained in an email you sent them. If you notice that the contact updates number is high, you should dig a little deeper and find out what contacts are doing once they get to the manage preferences page. Depending on the actions they are taking on the manage preferences page, you may need to re-work the content of the email, or re-evaluate the list or segment you are sending to.

Undeliverable (email)

The email undeliverable metric represents the number of sent emails that were not delivered.

The email undeliverable metric is important because it tells you how many of your sent emails were not delivered.

Hard Bounce (email)
Hard bounces are permanent delivery failures. For example, the mailbox and/or domain does not exist for an email address. The from hard bounce metric represents the number of sent emails that were not delivered due to hard bounces.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The from hard bounce metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of hard bounces, you need to review who you are sending to and the content you are sending.

Bad Email Address
The bad email address bounce type means that the email server in question has indicated that this is not a valid account. Whether the contact has left that host, had a typo in their registration, or simply made up the email address cannot be discerned from this message.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The bad email address metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of bad email address bounces, you need to review your contact gathering mechanisms. Are you forcing people to provide an email address? Contacts may just be making something up to get through the form. Or, perhaps the demographic you are appealing to is more likely to not want to give out their real email address. If so, you may want to tempt them to give a real address by telling them that you will send a coupon, more information, or a link they need to click to verify their account. It all really depends on how bad you want their email address. If you aren't going to validate addresses in some way, then you probably shouldn't require people to give you their email address.

Destination System Unreachable
The destination system unreachable hard bounce type means that there was a connection issue with the email server.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

A destination system unreachable hard bounce is different than a bad email address hard bounce (which results in immediate removal of the contact in question). This bounce type means that we will not retry sending this specific email to this specific contact at this time because it is not likely to succeed. Later deliveries to the contact may succeed.

Rejected Due To Message Content
The rejected due to message content hard bounce type means that the email server has identified the email as spam.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

We will not attempt to resend an email that results in a rejected due to message content hard bounce. If you see a number of these, then you should probably look at the message you are sending and take the time to run your message through a spam test. If you are still having problems or have questions about what may be causing this, please contact support.

Soft Bounce (email)
Soft bounces are temporary delivery failures. A soft bounce may occur if a contact's inbox is full, or the receiving email server is down.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The soft bounce metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of soft bounces, you should review who you are sending to and the content you are sending.

Temporary Contact Issue
Temporary contact issue means that there was a temporary issue at the receiving mail server with respect to the contact in question. An example of this is a mailbox full message.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

There isn't too much you can do about a temporary contact issue bounce. It may, however, be an early indicator that a user has abandoned this email address. If you want to be pro-active and try to stem these type of bounces from occurring, include the manage preferences link (using %%!manage_url%%) within your emails, in addition to the unsubscribe link. This allows users to easily update their email address.

Destination System Temporarily Unreachable
Destination system temporarily unreachable soft bounce type means that there was a temporary issue at the receiving mail server, such as a server busy message.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

A destination system temporarily unreachable bounce may be resolved via retries. If it is not, there is little you can do about this.

Deferred Due To Message Content
Deferred due to message content is quite similar to the rejected message content bounce. Emails aren't often identified this way, as ISPs don't want you to resend something they identify as spam.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

If you are seeing a majority of your emails being classified as deferred due to message content bounces, you should check your message and see if you can reduce its likelihood of being identified as spam.

Unclassified

The unclassified metric represents the number of bounces that could not be classified using our bounce classification system. We try our best to classify bounces and keep from showing them as unclassified so that you can better understand why bounces are occurring.

We developed our bounce classification system in such a way that the most common types of bounces would always be classified. If you are noticing a high number of unclassified bounces, then something outside of normal circumstances is likely occurring. In this case, you should contact support for assistance in diagnosing the problem.

Skipped

The skipped metric represents the total number of emails that were skipped and not sent to.

The skipped metric is important because it lets you know how many emails were not sent.
Note: For more detailed information on why a delivery was skipped, see the following metrics:
Email Frequency Cap (Skipped)
The frequency cap (skipped) metric represents the number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the email frequency cap settings you have in your account.
Tip: For more information on the email frequency cap settings, see Set Email Frequency Caps For Your Account.

There are several reasons why you might see a high number of emails skipped for exceeding your frequency cap settings. You could simply be scheduling too many deliveries to your contacts, or you might have an automated message rule that is sending too much. Skipped deliveries represent missed conversion opportunities, so you'll want to review your sending process to try and prevent skipped deliveries from occurring.

Email Onboarding (Skipped)
The onboarding (skipped) metric represents the total number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the number of contacts with a status of onboarding you can send to at this time. If you are continually seeing a high number of contacts skipped due to onboarding, it could mean you are trying to import a bad list. If you are importing a healthy list, contacts should very quickly move from onboarding to active. So, if you are continually seeing high numbers under onboarding (Skipped), you should re-examine the contacts you are importing or adding.
Tip: For more information on the automated onboarding process, see Automated Onboarding.

The onboarding (skipped) metric is important for two reasons. First, it let's you know about any contacts that could not be sent to. Second, it gives you an indication of how the contacts you are importing are affecting your account.

Contact Loss (email)

The contact loss metric represents the total number of contacts that were marked as inactive and can no longer receive marketing emails from you as a result of this email. For more information on the inactive status type, see Contact Status

The contact loss metric is important because it points out potential problems in the targeting of your deliveries, and/or the design and content of your message. If you notice a high number under contact loss, you should review both who you are sending to, and what you are sending them. There is a good chance you are either sending to a bad list or segment, or sending the wrong emails to the wrong group of contacts.

Email Unsubscribes (From Unsubscribes)
The unsubscribes metric represents the percentage of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by unsubscribing. Specifically these contacts reached an unsubscribed status after one of the following:
  • Complaining through an ISP feedback loop or through the application complaint system
  • Exceeding the bounce limit that you set

The unsubscribes metric is important because it better clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact unsubscribes themselves (via a manage preferences form or other method), this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to manually unsubscribe themselves to be counted in this metric.

From Complaint (email) The Complaint (From Complaint) metric represents the total number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via either an ISP feedback loop, or the application's complaint system.

The Complaint (From Complaint) metric is important because it clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via their ISP or via the application, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain via their ISP or via the application.

From Complaints- ISP FeedBack
The From Complaint—ISP Feedback metric represents the number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via an ISP feedback loop.
Warning: A high number of complaints will negatively impact your sender and delivery rating. For information on sender and delivery rating, see Sender and Delivery Rating.
Tip: For more information on fixing a low sender or delivery rating, see Tips For Fixing A Low Email Sender/Delivery Rating.

The From Complaint—ISP Feedback metric is important because it clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via their ISP, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain via their ISP. They can do this by clicking the Report Spam button (or similarly named button) after receiving an email from you.

From Complaint - Bronto Feedback
The From Complaint—Bronto Feedback metric represents the number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via the application. A contact can complain using a Complaint webform.
Warning: A high number of complaints will negatively impact your sender and delivery rating. For information on sender and delivery rating, see Sender and Delivery Rating.
Tip: For more information on fixing a low sender or delivery rating, see Tips For Fixing A Low Email Sender/Delivery Rating.
Tip: For more information on Complaint webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The From Complaint—Bronto Feedback metric is important because it clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via the application, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain the Complaint webform. They can do this by clicking the link to a Complaint webform in an email they receive from you.

Inactive Due To Bounces (email)
The inactive due to bounces metric represents the total number of contacts that were made inactive because they exceeded the bounce limit you have set in your account. The bounce limit represents the number of times emails sent to a particular contact can consecutively bounce before the contact is made inactive. Once a contact is made inactive, you can no longer send to them until they once again opt-in to receiving marketing emails from you.
Tip: For more information on bounces, see Email Bounce in help.
Tip: For more information on setting the bounce limit in your account, see Set A Bounce Limit For Your Account.

The inactive due to bounces metric is important because it better clarifies why you are losing contacts. If you notice a high number under inactive due to bounces, you should review both who you are sending to, and what you are sending them. There is a good chance you are either sending to a bad list or segment, or sending the wrong emails to the wrong group of contacts.