Detailed Contact Activity Report Metrics

Detailed contact activity reports allow you to download a report containing contact level metrics for a report.

When selecting to download a detailed contact activity report, you can choose to include all the available metrics, or specific metrics. Each of the metrics that can be selected for a detailed contact activity report are described below.

Metric Description Why It's Useful
Sent
The emails sent metric represents the total number of emails that were sent.
Note: Deleted email deliveries will still be counted as part of the emails sent metric.

The emails sent metric is important to know for two main reasons. First, you need to know the number of emails sent for the purpose of making sure you don't exceed the number of emails allocated for your account. Second, the emails sent metric is the starting point for evaluating how many of your emails actually got delivered.

Delivered

The emails delivered metric represents the total number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Accepted

The Emails delivered metric is important because it let's you know how many total emails were successfully delivered. Once you know how many emails were successfully delivered, you can begin further evaluating the levels of contact engagement (opens, clicks, conversions). You can also figure out how many unsuccessful emails were sent.

Undeliverable (email)

The email undeliverable metric represents the number of sent emails that were not delivered.

The email undeliverable metric is important because it tells you how many of your sent emails were not delivered.

Opens

The opens metric represents the unique opens. A unique open is recorded the first time a contact opens an email. If a contact opens an email 5 times, only 1 unique open is recorded. DMA/EEC equivalent: Unique Renders

The opens metric is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. Although you can't actually tell what your contacts are doing with the email you sent them, you can at least tell that they were interested enough to open it. A high number of opens is usually indicative of a strong subject line and a trusted from name, since these are the only things a contact can see in their inbox before actually opening the email you sent them.

Clicks

The clicks metric is a per contact metric that represents the unique clicks recorded. A unique click is recorded the first time a contact clicks any link contained in an email you send them. If a contact clicks a link 9 times, 1 unique click will be recorded. If 2 contacts each click a link 10 times, then 2 clicks will be recorded. If a single contact clicks 5 different links, than 1 unique click is recorded and 1 would appear under the clicks metric. DMA/EEC equivalent: Click Through

The clicks metric is important because it represents a level of contact engagement beyond just opens, and begins to highlight the effectiveness of the content contained in your emails. With clicks, you can tell how many contacts were interested enough to open and then click the links contained in the email you sent them.

Conversions

The conversions metric represents the unique conversions recorded. Conversions track contacts who placed an order after interacting with a message delivery (email or SMS). Bronto records unique conversions the first time a contact makes a purchase connected with a message delivery. For example, if a contact buys something from you through a message link, and later makes a second purchase, only one unique conversion is recorded.

The purpose of sending email marketing messages is to compel your contacts to perform an action. Opens may tell you if the subject line is well written, and clicks may tell you how engaging the content is. However, conversions tell you if your contacts are actually performing the action that is the goal of your email marketing campaign.

Forwards To A Friend
The forwards to a friend metric represents the total number of times a contact forwarded an email you sent them using the forward to a friend link.
Tip: For more information on adding a forward to a friend link to your message, see Insert A Link To A Webform Using The WYSIWYG Editor. For more information on forward to a friend webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The forwards to a friend metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement, and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact makes the effort to use the forward to a friend link, most of the time it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to forward it to a friend.

Contact Updates (email)
The contact updates metric represents the number of times a contact updated their information using a manage preferences link contained in an email you sent them.
Tip: For more information on adding a manage preferences link to your message, see Insert A Link To A Webform Using The WYSIWYG Editor. For more information on manage preferences webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The contact updates metric is important because it allows you to see how many contacts updated their information via a manage preferences link contained in an email you sent them. If you notice that the contact updates number is high, you should dig a little deeper and find out what contacts are doing once they get to the manage preferences page. Depending on the actions they are taking on the manage preferences page, you may need to re-work the content of the email, or re-evaluate the list or segment you are sending to.

Email Unsubscribes (From Unsubscribes)
The unsubscribes metric represents the percentage of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by unsubscribing. Specifically these contacts reached an unsubscribed status after one of the following:
  • Complaining through an ISP feedback loop or through the application complaint system
  • Exceeding the bounce limit that you set

The unsubscribes metric is important because it better clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact unsubscribes themselves (via a manage preferences form or other method), this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to manually unsubscribe themselves to be counted in this metric.

Email Frequency Cap (Skipped)
The frequency cap (skipped) metric represents the number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the email frequency cap settings you have in your account.
Tip: For more information on the email frequency cap settings, see Set Email Frequency Caps For Your Account.

There are several reasons why you might see a high number of emails skipped for exceeding your frequency cap settings. You could simply be scheduling too many deliveries to your contacts, or you might have an automated message rule that is sending too much. Skipped deliveries represent missed conversion opportunities, so you'll want to review your sending process to try and prevent skipped deliveries from occurring.

Email Onboarding (Skipped)
The onboarding (skipped) metric represents the total number of contacts that were not sent to because doing so would exceed the number of contacts with a status of onboarding you can send to at this time. If you are continually seeing a high number of contacts skipped due to onboarding, it could mean you are trying to import a bad list. If you are importing a healthy list, contacts should very quickly move from onboarding to active. So, if you are continually seeing high numbers under onboarding (Skipped), you should re-examine the contacts you are importing or adding.
Tip: For more information on the automated onboarding process, see Automated Onboarding.

The onboarding (skipped) metric is important for two reasons. First, it let's you know about any contacts that could not be sent to. Second, it gives you an indication of how the contacts you are importing are affecting your account.