Comparison Report Detailed Open Metrics

You can view the following metrics:

Metric Description Why It's Useful
Delivered

The emails delivered metric represents the total number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Accepted

The Emails delivered metric is important because it let's you know how many total emails were successfully delivered. Once you know how many emails were successfully delivered, you can begin further evaluating the levels of contact engagement (opens, clicks, conversions). You can also figure out how many unsuccessful emails were sent.

Opens

The opens metric represents the unique opens. A unique open is recorded the first time a contact opens an email. If a contact opens an email 5 times, only 1 unique open is recorded. DMA/EEC equivalent: Unique Renders

The opens metric is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. Although you can't actually tell what your contacts are doing with the email you sent them, you can at least tell that they were interested enough to open it. A high number of opens is usually indicative of a strong subject line and a trusted from name, since these are the only things a contact can see in their inbox before actually opening the email you sent them.

Open Rate

The open rate represents the percentage of emails that were opened, as compared to the number of emails that were successfully delivered. DMA/EEC equivalent: Render Rate The calculation does not take into account the send history for individual messages. Therefore, on Over Time and Date Range reports, it is possible for the rates to equal a value greater than 100% if enough messages sent on a date prior to the start of the report are included in the calculation. For example, a message was sent 100 times a previous day and 100 times on a date within the report range. The message is opened 125 times within the report range. In this case, the Open Rate on the report is 125% because the message was opened more times than it was sent.

The open rate is important because it represents the first level of contact engagement. The open rate lets you see out of all the contacts who received the email you sent, who actually took the time to open it. You can use the open rate to gauge the effectiveness of your from name, from address, and subject line.

Contact Loss Metrics On Comparison Reports
Tip: The lowest rates in this section will be highlighted green, and the highest rates will be highlighted red. With contact loss metrics, the lower numbers/rates, the better.
Metric Description Why It's Useful
Contact Loss (email)

The contact loss metric represents the total number of contacts that were marked as inactive and can no longer receive marketing emails from you as a result of this email. For more information on the inactive status type, see Contact Status

The contact loss metric is important because it points out potential problems in the targeting of your deliveries, and/or the design and content of your message. If you notice a high number under contact loss, you should review both who you are sending to, and what you are sending them. There is a good chance you are either sending to a bad list or segment, or sending the wrong emails to the wrong group of contacts.

Email Unsubscribes (From Unsubscribes)
The unsubscribes metric represents the percentage of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by unsubscribing. Specifically these contacts reached an unsubscribed status after one of the following:
  • Complaining through an ISP feedback loop or through the application complaint system
  • Exceeding the bounce limit that you set

The unsubscribes metric is important because it better clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact unsubscribes themselves (via a manage preferences form or other method), this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to manually unsubscribe themselves to be counted in this metric.

From Complaint (email) The Complaint (From Complaint) metric represents the total number of contacts that were lost (made inactive) by complaining via either an ISP feedback loop, or the application's complaint system.

The Complaint (From Complaint) metric is important because it clarifies why you are losing contacts. If a contact is unsubscribed because they complained via their ISP or via the application, this tells you that either you are sending to the wrong people, or sending the wrong content. Unlike bounces, which are the result of technical errors sent back from the receiving mail server, a contact actually has to complain via their ISP or via the application.

Inactive Due To Bounces (email)
The inactive due to bounces metric represents the total number of contacts that were made inactive because they exceeded the bounce limit you have set in your account. The bounce limit represents the number of times emails sent to a particular contact can consecutively bounce before the contact is made inactive. Once a contact is made inactive, you can no longer send to them until they once again opt-in to receiving marketing emails from you.
Tip: For more information on bounces, see Email Bounce in help.
Tip: For more information on setting the bounce limit in your account, see Set A Bounce Limit For Your Account.

The inactive due to bounces metric is important because it better clarifies why you are losing contacts. If you notice a high number under inactive due to bounces, you should review both who you are sending to, and what you are sending them. There is a good chance you are either sending to a bad list or segment, or sending the wrong emails to the wrong group of contacts.

Undeliverable Metrics On Reports
Tip: The lowest rates in this section will be highlighted green, and the highest rates will be highlighted red. With undeliverable metrics, the lower numbers/rates, the better.
Metric Description Why It's Useful
Undeliverable (email)

The email undeliverable metric represents the number of sent emails that were not delivered.

The email undeliverable metric is important because it tells you how many of your sent emails were not delivered.

Hard Bounce (email)
Hard bounces are permanent delivery failures. For example, the mailbox and/or domain does not exist for an email address. The from hard bounce metric represents the number of sent emails that were not delivered due to hard bounces.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The from hard bounce metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of hard bounces, you need to review who you are sending to and the content you are sending.

Soft Bounce (email)
Soft bounces are temporary delivery failures. A soft bounce may occur if a contact's inbox is full, or the receiving email server is down.
Tip: For more information on the bounce classification system, see Email Bounce.

The soft bounce metric is important because it clarifies why contacts cannot be delivered to. If you are seeing a lot of soft bounces, you should review who you are sending to and the content you are sending.

Social And Forward to a Friend Metrics On Comparison Reports
Tip: The highest rates in this section will be highlighted green, and the lowest rates will be highlighted red.
Metric Description Why It's Useful
Forwards To A Friend
The forwards to a friend metric represents the total number of times a contact forwarded an email you sent them using the forward to a friend link.
Tip: For more information on adding a forward to a friend link to your message, see Insert A Link To A Webform Using The WYSIWYG Editor. For more information on forward to a friend webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The forwards to a friend metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement, and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact makes the effort to use the forward to a friend link, most of the time it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to forward it to a friend.

Contacts Who Shared (email)
The contacts who shared metric represents the number of contacts who used the social sharing links contained in the email. For example,
  • Contact A clicks the Facebook sharing link
  • Contact B clicks the Twitter and LinkedIn sharing links
  • Contact C clicks the Facebook and Twitter sharing links
Then 3 is recorded for the Contacts Who Shared metric.
Note: Forward to a friend URLs are not included in the total social shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The contacts who shared metric is important because it allows you to see how many contacts used at least 1 of the social sharing links contained in an email message you sent them.

Total Social Shares (email)
The total social shares metric represents the total number of times social sharing links contained in the email were clicked. For example, if one contact uses the Twitter social sharing link, and another contact uses the Facebook social sharing link, then 2 would be recorded for the total social shares.
Note: Forward to a friend URLs are not included in the total social shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The total social shares metric is important because it highlights both contact engagement and the effectiveness of the email you sent. If a contact takes the time to use the social sharing links, then most likely it means they found the email you sent them compelling enough to share it with one of their social networks.

Social Views (email)
The social views metric represents the total number of times an email shared via social sharing links was viewed.
Note: Views will be counted for anyone that views the email shared via social sharing links, not just contacts in your account. Forward to a friend URLs are not included in the social shares metric.
Tip: For more information on social sharing links, see Social Share Links in Emails.

The social views metric is important because it allows you to see how effective the email you sent is after it has been shared via social sharing links. This metric can give you insight into the effectiveness of using social sharing links in your emails, as well as the effectiveness of your emails with an audience outside your contacts.

Contact Updates (email)
The contact updates metric represents the number of times a contact updated their information using a manage preferences link contained in an email you sent them.
Tip: For more information on adding a manage preferences link to your message, see Insert A Link To A Webform Using The WYSIWYG Editor. For more information on manage preferences webforms, see Types of Webforms.

The contact updates metric is important because it allows you to see how many contacts updated their information via a manage preferences link contained in an email you sent them. If you notice that the contact updates number is high, you should dig a little deeper and find out what contacts are doing once they get to the manage preferences page. Depending on the actions they are taking on the manage preferences page, you may need to re-work the content of the email, or re-evaluate the list or segment you are sending to.

Tip: The highest rates in this section will be highlighted green, and the lowest rates will be highlighted red.